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DAILY NEWS ANALYSIS

  • 24 April, 2020

  • 9 Min Read

Horticulture - Mission for Integrated Development of Horticulture (MIDH)

Horticulture - Mission for Integrated Development of Horticulture (MIDH)

Part of: GS-III- Economy (PT-MAINS-PERSONALITY TEST)

Recently, Department of Agriculture, Cooperation and Farmers Welfare released the Third Advanced Estimate (2018-19) of Area and Production of various Horticulture Crops. As per the report, the total horticulture production in the country is estimated to be 313.85 million tonnes which is 0.69% higher than the horticulture production of 311.71 million tonnes in 2017-18. The area under horticulture crops has increased to 25.49 million hectares in 2018-19 from 25.43 million hectares in 2017-18.

What is Horticulture?

  • Horticulture is the branch of agriculture concerned with intensively cultured plants directly used by man for food, medicinal purposes and aesthetic gratification.
  • In simpler words, it is cultivation, production and sale of vegetables, fruits, flowers, herbs, ornamental or exotic plants.
  • The term Horticulture is derived from the Latin words hortus (garden) and cult?ra (cultivation).
  • L.H. Bailey is considered the Father of American Horticulture and M.H. Marigowda is considered the Father of Indian Horticulture.

Classification

  • Pomology: Planting, harvesting, storing, processing, and marketing of fruit and nut crops.
  • Olericulture: Producing and marketing vegetables.
  • Arboriculture: Study, selection and care of individual trees, shrubs or other perennial woody plants.
  • Ornamental Horticulture: It has two subparts-
    • Floriculture: Production, use and marketing of floral crops.
    • Landscape Horticulture: Production and marketing of plants used to beautify the outdoor environment.

Features of Horticulture in India

  • Horticulture sector has become one of the major drivers of growth as it is more remunerative than the agricultural sector (food grains mainly).
  • This sector provides employment possibilities across primary, secondary and tertiary sectors.
  • Horticulture crops, fruits are more resilient to change in weather conditions and the vegetables augment the income of small and marginal farmers.
  • Water utilisation is very low, minimising the risk of crop failure and it can be done on smaller farms.
  • Multiple crops are planted simultaneously to get more yield and to use the maximum of the fertilisers.
  • This sector enables the population to eat a diverse and balanced diet for a healthy lifestyle.
  • It became a key driver for economic development in many of the states in the country where Division of Horticulture of Indian Council of Agricultural Research is playing a pivotal role.

Indian Council of Agricultural Resource (ICAR)

  • An autonomous organisation under the Department of Agricultural Research and Education (DARE).
  • Formerly known as Imperial Council of Agricultural Research, it was established on 16 July 1929.
  • Headquartered at New Delhi.
  • It is the apex body for coordinating, guiding and managing research and education in agriculture including horticulture, fisheries and animal sciences in the entire country.

Mission for Integrated Development of Horticulture

Mission for Integrated Development of Horticulture (MIDH) is a Centrally Sponsored Scheme for the holistic growth of the horticulture sector covering fruits, vegetables, root & tuber crops, mushrooms, spices, flowers, aromatic plants, coconut, cashew, cocoa and bamboo.

While Government of India (GOI) contributes 85% of total outlay for developmental programmes in all the states except the states in North East and Himalayas, 15% share is contributed by State Governments. In the case of North Eastern States and Himalayan States, GOI contribution is 100%. Similarly, for development of bamboo and programmes of National Horticulture Board (NHB), Coconut Development Board (CDB), Central Institute for Horticulture (CIH), Nagaland and the National Level Agencies (NLA), GOI contribution will be 100%.

Main objectives of Mission

  1. Promote holistic growth of horticulture sector, including bamboo and coconut through area based regionally differentiated strategies, which includes research, technology promotion, extension, post harvest management, processing and marketing, in consonance with comparative advantage of each State/region and its diverse agro-climatic features;
  2. Encourage aggregation of farmers into farmer groups like FIGs/FPOs and FPCs to bring economy of scale and scope.
  3. Enhance horticulture production, augment farmers, income and strengthen nutritional security;
  4. Improve productivity by way of quality germplasm, planting material and water use efficiency through Micro Irrigation.
  5. Support skill development and create employment generation opportunities for rural youth in horticulture and post harvest management, especially in the cold chain sector

Sub-schemes and area of operation

Sl. No.

Sub Scheme

Target group / area of operation

1

National Horticulture Mission (NHM)

All states & UTs except states in NE and Himalayan Region.

2

Horticulture Mission for North East & Himalayan States (HMNEH)

All states in NE and Himalayan Region - Arunachal Pradesh,

Assam, Manipur, Mizoram, Nagaland, Meghalaya, Sikkim, Tripura,

Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand and Jammu & Kashmir

3

National Bamboo Mission (NBM)

All states & UTs

4

National Horticulture Board (NHB)

All states & UTs focusing on commercial horticulture

5

Coconut Development Board (CDB)

All States and UTs where coconut is grown

6

Central Institute for Horticulture (CIH)

NE states, focusing on HRD and capacity building.

Activities for which financial assistance is provided

Under MIDH, financial assistance is provided for following major interventions/activities:

  • Setting up of nurseries, tissue culture units for production of quality seed and planting material.
  • Area expansion i.e. Establishment of new orchards and gardens for fruits, vegetables, and flowers. · Rejuvenation of unproductive, old, and senile orchards.
  • Protected cultivation, i.e. poly-house, green-house, etc, to improve the productivity & grow off season high value vegetables and flowers.
  • Organic farming and certification.
  • Creation of water resources structures and watershed management.
  • Bee-keeping for pollination.
  • Horticulture Mechanization.
  • Creation of Post Harvest Management and Marketing infrastructure.

Key elements of the mission

  1. Base line survey
  2. Involvement of Panchayati Raj institutions
  3. Area based Annual and Perspective Plans based on end to end approach with backward and forward linkages
  4. Applied Research with focus on Region
  5. Demand driven production based on cluster approach
  6. Availability of quality seeds and planting material
  7. Technology driven programmes to improve productivity and quality, e.g.
    • Introduction of improved varieties.
    • Rejuvenation with improved cultivars.
    • High Density Plantations.
    • Use of Plastics.
    • Beekeeping for cross pollination
    • Capacity building of farmers and personnel
    • Mechanization
    • Demonstration of latest technologies
  8. Post Harvest Management and cold chain
  9. Marketing infrastructure development
  10. Meticulous reporting and monitoring
  11. Data base generation, compilation and analysis

Source: Vikas pedia


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