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DAILY NEWS ANALYSIS

GS-III :
  • 09 March, 2020

  • 7 Min Read

Red Panda and IUCN

Red Panda

Part of: GS Prelims and GS-III- Environment

  1. Hunting of Red Panda has decreased as per study by wildlife trade monitoring network TRAFFIC, indicative of the success of awareness campaigns.
  2. Red panda is endemic to the temperate forests of the Himalayas.
  3. Native to the eastern Himalayas and southwestern China.
  4. It is arboreal, feeds mainly on bamboo, but also eats eggs, birds, and insects
  • Habitat: Sikkim, Assam, Meghalaya, West Bengal and northern Arunachal Pradesh.
  • Threat: Hunted for meat and fur, besides illegal capture for the pet trade.
  • IUCN Status: Endangered
  • Significance: Red panda’s survival is crucial for the eastern and north-eastern Himalayan subalpine conifer forests and the eastern Himalayan broadleaf forests
  • Estimated Population: 14,500 animals in the wild across Nepal, Bhutan, India, China and Myanmar.
  • It is the state animal of Sikkim

Protected areas

  • Kanchendzonga National Park (NP) — Sikkim
  • Neora Valley NP – West Bengal
  • Namdapha National Park – Arunachal Pradesh
  • Singalila National Park – West Bengal

About IUCN

The International Union for Conservation of Nature

  • IUCN is a membership union uniquely composed of both government and civil society organisations.
  • Created in 1948, it is the global authority on the status of the natural world and the measures needed to safeguard it.
  • It is headquartered in Switzerland.
  • The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, is the world's most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species.

PT-HIT

The International Union for Conservation of Nature works to achieve the following goals:

  1. To provide scientific data on the status of species and subspecies at a global level.
  2. To address the factors of concern and spread awareness regarding the species and biodiversity extinction.
  3. To plan a layout for the conservation of biodiversity

    • It uses a set of quantitative criteria to evaluate the extinction risk of species. These criteria are relevant to most species and all regions of the world.
    • The IUCN Red List Categories define the extinction risk of species assessed. Nine categories extend from NE (Not Evaluated) to EX (Extinct). Critically Endangered (CR), Endangered (EN) and Vulnerable (VU) species are considered to be threatened with extinction.
    • It is recognized as the most authoritative guide to the status of biological diversity.
    • It is also a key indicator for the SDGs and Aichi Targets.
  • Extinct (EX) – No known individuals remaining.
  • Extinct in the wild (EW) – Known only to survive in captivity, or as a naturalized population outside its historic range.
  • Critically endangered (CR) – Extremely high risk of extinction in the wild.
  • Endangered (EN) – High risk of extinction in the wild.
  • Vulnerable (VU) – High risk of endangerment in the wild.
  • Near threatened (NT) – Likely to become endangered in the near future.
  • Least concern (LC) – Lowest risk. Does not qualify for a more at-risk category. Widespread and abundant taxa are included in this category.
  • Data deficient (DD) – Not enough data to make an assessment of its risk of extinction.
  • Not evaluated (NE) – Has not yet been evaluated against the criteria

List of critically endangered species in India as per IUCN Red List 2019

The list of critically endangered species in India from various categories are given below:

Critically Endangered Mammals

  1. Pygmy Hog
  2. Andaman White-toothed Shrew
  3. Jenkin’s Andaman Spiny Shrew
  4. Nicobar White-tailed Shrew
  5. Kondana Rat
  6. Large Rock Rat or Elvira Rat
  7. Namdapha Flying Squirrel
  8. Malabar Civet
  9. Sumatran Rhinoceros
  10. Javan Rhinoceros

Critically Endangered Birds

  1. Aythya baeri
  2. Forest Owlet
  3. Great Indian Bustard
  4. Bengal Florican
  5. Siberian Crane
  6. Spoon-billed Sandpiper
  7. Sociable Lapwing
  8. Jerdon’s Courser
  9. White-backed Vulture
  10. Red-headed Vulture
  11. White-bellied Heron
  12. Slender-billed Vulture
  13. Indian Vulture
  14. Pink-headed Duck
  15. Himalayan Quail

Critically Endangered Reptiles

  1. Gharial
  2. Hawksbill Turtle
  3. Leatherback Turtle
  4. River Terrapin
  5. Bengal Roof Turtle
  6. Sispara day gecko

Critically Endangered Fishes

  1. Pondicherry Shark
  2. Ganges Shark
  3. Knife-tooth Sawfish
  4. Large-tooth Sawfish
  5. Narrow-snout Sawfish

IUCN Conservation Plan for 2020

The strategy for the conservation of nature by IUCN is as follows:

  1. Assess – Focus on monitoring species and informing the world about the status and trends of biodiversity, thus providing measures for the protection of our biosphere.
  2. Plan – Aims to enhance collaborative and science-based strategies to ensure the most effective species conservation actions.
  3. Act – Improve the status of biodiversity, by mobilizing actions involving governments, educational institutions, civil society, and the private sector.
  4. Communicate – The effectiveness of IUCN’s species conservation work is enhanced through strategic and targeted communications.

Source: TH/IUCN WEB


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